Black Dolls: Holding up the mirror to society’s ugliness

 

Disgust. That is the most appropriate term for the video that captured the reaction of a White American child receiving a “Black doll” for a Christmas present. The fact that the adults recording thought it a funny “prank” to present a Black doll to their white children is beyond disgusting. And it is disappointing on quite a few levels.

First, let’s acknowledge that for decades, Black children have had no other option than to play with toys that were not reflective of their own inherent, magical beauty.  I myself can recall a girlhood which lacked options for my peers and I to see/be ourselves during playtime. Even when “Black” doll/toy options were presented, it was always some hue of grey-Black that I have yet to see on any living, breathing human from here to Africa. Features so  exaggerated, no wonder Black children refused to play with their “Black” dolls, which in turns prompts the explaining and cajoling yet again, this time to extol the merits of beauty found in all Black people. See how Black parenting is ever expansive and exhausting? We inherit teaching moments for what White parents take for granted. We don’t get a choice.

So while Black parents have had the onus of explaining, excusing, and teaching our children about diversity and the appreciation for other cultures, white parents have smugly presented the notion that “other” means inferior, ugly, worthless, and alien.

And it must be noted, that because of white supremacy’s elaborate design, historically most Black children rarely scoff at receiving white dolls. The disdain for one’s self and all things representative is the cost Black children pay to play…with dolls, with their history, with their own humanity. So much miseducation. Intense work to relearn and rediscover your value.

That’s the privilege of white supremacy…when YOUR identity is never in question as being the “other.” When everything you encounter reinforces your worth. Everything from toys to movie stars to marketing to policy dictates that you are the standard.

But you are not. Which is what has always been the problem. The problem for whites, really. People of color have no qualms with sharing the human spectrum. We buy into the ideal that beauty and value can be found in other races. Our children are taught to accept differences in others…heck the Church joins in the education of Black child identity and by age 4 everyone believes the words to the song Jesus Loves the Little Children, remember that? It went like this…

“Jesus loves the little children

all the children of the world.

Red and Yellow

Black and White

all are precious in his sight

Jesus loves the children of the world”

My concern is for the children. Working with Black girls, training them in media literacy and to be digital storytellers of their own experiences, my mission is to help them critically examine the messages that tell them they are inferior and stigmatize them. It is work necessary to help them move beyond the mental block of negative media and stereotypes that have been appropriated to them.  It is the work being done in communities of color all across this country; the repairing of girl magic and mending spirits broken by the ugliness of our society.

Yet, while we are tending to our girls, distinguished organizations and programs that claim to serve girls and fight for equality for all girls, seem to be avoiding an imperative teaching moment. I have watched the film Missrepresentation. I admire the writings of those claiming to build leaders amongst girls and end the “mean girl” behaviors. But what each of these have in common is 1.) A traditional white audience  2.) They negate the race conversation, refusing to deal with perpetuation of stereotypes and prejudice amongst those they serve 3.) When/if race is mentioned, it is an aside. The message is, the only change needed is to allow girls/women to be at the table… that is white women and girls.

In the times of Black Lives Matter, some may rebuff this as a tiny distraction to the overall liberation of Black and Brown people. Many may argue that this is just a play thing of no significance.

Well, I beg to differ. First of all, Black children need to love and value themselves beyond the lens of White people. There is no way they will be moved to join a movement for their liberation if they are not conscious to the truth. Secondly, if there is to be trust amongst allies, White adults must unequivocally point out this type of ignorance. There is far too much silence from those who claim to be fighting for equality and feminism. And thirdly, begin teaching their children at the earliest opportunities an appreciation for ALL peoples.

Blacks have gone far above and beyond convincing White America about our humanity. It is high time we tap out. Now it’s White America’s turn to look at their own instances of inhumanity and practices of dehumanization, then work to correct it. This is a prime teachable moment. I can’t wait to see the lessons in practice.

 

Teaching tips:

  • Expose children to other cultures
  • Foster authentic interactions that allow others to fully show up
  • Be honest with children about history
  • Provide cultural reading material, film screenings
  • Invite guest speakers to share their experiences
  • Collaborate for diverse programming
  • Follow #Blackgirlsmatter
  • Choose any of these culturally framed reads from this age-appropriate list
  • Make the Black Doll a conscious consumer choice

Community-based organizations doing the work across the country :

Girls Like Me Project (Chicago)

FAAN Mail (Philly)

Black Girls Rock (NYC)

Daughters of the Collective (Detroit)

WISEE Queen Dream Institute (Oakland/Bay area)

About the author…

keish 1

 

 

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Holiday shopping with Girl-preneur power!

One of the biggest honors of 2013 was the opportunity Girls Like Me Project had to foster the independent spirit of girls like me by supporting businesses of  girl-preneurs.

There is mutual pride that comes from investing and empowering our girls through enterprise and economic development. This blog post is dedicated to all the girls who dare to dream a dream, and those who are legacy builders.

The girl-preneurs featured below have provided services and/or donated items to support GLMPI giveaways and raffles.

Please help support their dreams and consider shopping with them for the holiday season and beyond. Here are our favorite girl-preneurs!

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Angel Beasley of Angel & Co.

Little Angel is indeed an earthly Angel! She started her business by the time she was 10 years old. Today her sweet, soft voice is reflective of the care she puts into her business Angel & Co. ; a multi-division company which offers Cookn’ Cookies by Angel; Heavenly Scents by Angel; and Designer Angel Origami Owl.  She is a big power broker in a small package! Visit Angel & Co. website and make a purchase, or book her for your next vendor event!

Amaya Anderson 13 Freshman AngelFace Collection™ by Amaya

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AngelFace Collection by Amaya is an accessories company. All items are handmade and uniquely designed with your individuality in mind. Man or woman, boy or girl, sports or formal, AngelFace Collection by Amaya is here to accessorize you.

She’s always loved arts and crafts and needed a way to make money. She saw some jewelry at a market fair and decided she would make her own and sell it for profit.

AngelFace Collection custom item

AngelFace Collection custom item

AngelFace Collection bracelets

AngelFace Collection bracelets

The name of the company is inspired by her nickname given to her by her deceased maternal grandmother. Visit AngelFace Collection online to make your purchase today! 

GLMPI would be remiss if we did not highlight the business of a woman whose selfless giving and community responsibility only enhances her enterprising spirit!

Ms. Peggy Riggins of Soul Purpose

561280_518759218160082_1807241337_nPeggy was so very generous  to provide the products and service to deliver hand massages at the first GLMPI Pampered Power Talk. We cannot thank her nor promote her business enough. Not only because she has been so generous, but because she truly believes in creating opportunities to empower girls and women.

1269648_642516492448306_1625552622_oShe is a gracious and humble servant, one who believes in giving back to the community. You can support Peggy in the Holiday season or for your self-care regime needs. Her products are perfect for special gifts and tokens of appreciation. Also, keep Peggy in mind for fundraising partnerships. Visit her website to find out more information and to get your pamper shopping on!

Girls Like Me Project, Inc. is so very proud of each of these Girl Power-Girl Preneurs and we look forward to partnering and supporting them in bigger ways in 2014 and beyond!